behind the scenes, industry, tips

Our favourite grape varieties

One of the trickiest things about wine is understanding the grapes that are used. Let me get out a little disclaimer first, I still get so lost when it comes to the grapes around the world! The beauty of working in this industry and with our fantastic Sommelier Duncan is that I get to try a lot of different wines. This enables me to experience so many different grapes and see what I really like.

I thought it might be helpful and possibly interesting if I put together my favourite grapes used on their own but also blended. This is my personal choice and I’m sure we all have our favourites. I’d love to hear from you all if you have certain grapes you like in the comments below.

Nebbiolo

The superstar grape of the Piemonte region of Italy, Nebbiolo is the grape behind Barolo. It packs complex flavours and aromas like rose, cherry, truffle, tobacco and leather making it a very enjoyable drink. Nebbiolo has high tannin and acidity enabling it to be paired with some nice big flavours including roasted meats, garlic and herbs. I love a Barolo and we will certainly be seeing them again in Tring.

Syrah

The darker cousin of the Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah is packed with antioxidants so it’s basically a health drink. Accented by blackberry, blueberry, pepper and herbs it’s a great match for red meat. Often found in the Rhone valley in France but also being produced by some fantastic New World vineyards. We sometimes have a Jim Barry Shiraz on the menu which is easily the best Shiraz(Syrah) I’ve tasted.

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the lightest of the red grapes and probably my favourite wine at the moment. It’s nice and light yet packed full of amazing flavours like cherry, raspberry, vanilla and mushrooms. It does tend to spend a little bit of time in French oak which helps give it that wonderful vanilla edge. A relatively mild tannin and acidity level make it a very drinkable wine with or without food.

Cabernet Sauvignon 

Oh dear another one of my favourite wines, sounds like I may have a problem. Let’s just accept I love wine. Cabernet is the totally opposite end of the scale to Pinot Noir. Big and juicy, packed with dark fruit like black cherry, black currant and blackberry it really does suit a nice juicy steak. Add in the bold tannins and it just gets better.

Viognier

An often over looked wine but one that has featured on our list for a long time now, Viognier really does give amazing value for money. A nice full bodied wine with apple, citrus, pear and peach it’s one of those wines that you can easily drink with or without food. We often put it alongside a slightly more complex fish dish but it also works well with food with a little spice in it.

Riesling

Oh Reisling, what did Blue Nun do to you? Much like Chardonnay this fantastic wine has been given a bad reputation by some shocking wine making practices. Did you know they aren’t all super sweet? This grape can pack some fantastic fruit flavours including apricot, peach, apple and lime making it an obvious choice for a nice light fish dish. A common scent to get from Riesling and possibly why some people get put off is petrol. Yes you heard it right, the stuff you stick in your car. Don’t let this put you off as it really is a stunning drink.

Chardonnay

Yet another wine with a bad reputation due some dodgy techniques. Gone are the day of steeping the wine with oak chips or even adding oak essence. A good chardonnay with have great lemon, apple, pear and pineapple, followed up with vanilla, baked tarts and butter. Not all Chardonnay goes into oak either but when it does and it’s done properly it is a stunning, big, bold wine. Oh and don’t forget, that chablis and champagne you love? Yeah, that has chardonnay in it.

Sauvignon Blanc

Known at Crockers as the white wine drinkers safe choice. We absolutely love Sauvignon Blanc and it’s wide array of flavours and scents. We have a particularly good one on at the moment from New Zealand which will be following us to Tring. Packed with lime, green apple, lemon grass and elderflower it really does tick a lot of boxes. Add in a bit of vanilla and butter if it’s spent some time in oak it really is a great rounded wine.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little look into the wines that I love and we sell at Crockers. Don’t forget I want to hear what your favourite grapes are and why so please leave a comment below.

Thanks

Luke

Crockers Tring

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